Honesty & Common Sense & Google Go Together

Posted in Uncategorized on December 12th, 2011 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

We were recently placed in a situation were a new client requested we sit in on a visit with their old exterminator to determine if they were being treated fairly.  The very fact we call them our new client hints as to what we found, nevertheless the story is worth the while.   So grab a cup of coffee and see how a little common sense can help you determine the honesty level of your service providers.

In the situation mentioned above the client was dealing with wildlife invading the attic space of their home.  The solution is pretty straight forward, trap and remove the wild animals, and seal off the known entry points.  In this case raccoons had torn two holes into the attic just above the garage.  However, their old company found additional entry points to the home from under the ground level concrete front porch.

Yes, you read that correctly.  The exterminator claiming decades of experience was suggesting raccoons were entering the attic by crawling under the front porch.  This additional entry point added hundreds of dollars to the bid and called into question the stability of the structure.

And thus common sense comes into play.  Even a person with little if any construction experience would expect the ground to be an entry point to the attic.  The wildlife expert was attempting to raise his billing amount by several hundreds of dollars by performing unneeded repairs to the front porch area.

At Gateway Pest Control we don’t try to oversell our service, we detail our recommendations and leave the decision to  our clients.  We encourage you to sit back, review our plans and present us with any questions that might arise.  Even if you have very little experience with the issue at hand you can “GOOGLE” nearly every problem.  Of course google isn’t the solution to every issue, but it can put you on the proper course.  If nothing else than allowing you to see when someone is trying to pad the bill with unneeded services.

If you have questions we are always just a phone call away:

(636) 525-1008

or

(314) 291-7622

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Carpenter Ants in Missouri

Posted in Uncategorized on June 7th, 2011 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

Best exterminator for Carpenter Ants in St. Louis

So you are looking for the best pest control company or exterminator to rid your home and yard of Carpenter Ants?  The answer is simple, Gateway Pest Control is the best most affordable solution for Carpenter Ants in the St. Louis, St. Charles and Jefferson County area.  In fact, we are so confident in our abilities we will make the following suggestion.  Call a handful of other exterminators and then call us (636) 525-1008.  Ask for a quote and advice on Carpenter Ants and then simply choose the company you feel honestly answered your questions.  Nine out ten callers end up booking service with Gateway Pest.

Why?  We understand Carpenter Ants are harder to control than many other types of ants.  And as such our technicians are adequately licensed to deal with any situation.  Most exterminators are not qualified to treat beyond the boundaries of your home.  As such they avoid answering questions about attacking ants at their nest, they simply want to spray the interior and exterior walls and call it good.

Oh sure protecting the boundaries of your home will temporarily keep the ants out of  your home, and even delay them from destroying your deck for a month or two.  But in the end the poison will weaken and they will attack again.  The other companies will gladly sign you up on a quarterly plan and return every three months to spray your home, and yet they will never attempt to destroy the ant colony.  The primary reason really is unclear; maybe they don’t truly understand the challenge, or lack the proper training, but most likely it is because they are not licensed to treat beyond the boundaries of your home and thus never think to attack the ants in their home instead of your home.

At Gateway Pest Control we use a three prong approach when dealing with ants.  First, like every other exterminator in town we will spray the interior and exterior of your home.  Realising that just spraying chemicals alone will not solve the problem we move on to step two, baiting.  Ants are constantly looking for a food supply, if  you are seeing large numbers of ants inside your home chances are they have found a food supply and aided by pheromones invited the entire colony.  We train our techs to use the ants biology against them by placing bait in the high traffic areas.  Basically we supply them with a poison pill designed to destroy the colony as they share the bounty of their search.

Baiting is a critical step in destroying an ant colony, however rarely does it work entirely as a stand alone approach, and thus step actually attacking the ant colony.  When possible we apply two types of control, liquid and granules.  The liquid chemical is instant death with a residual affect that will continue to control the ants for weeks.  The granules are a similar chemistry but their formulation allows them to remain in place for months and ultimately are what destroys the colony solving your issue with carpenter ants.

Simply stated to solve your ant, especially carpenter ant problem just call Gateway Pest Control at (636) 525-1008 or (314) 291-7622

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Pest Control Do It Yourself Tips

Posted in Uncategorized on November 24th, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

Jefferson County Missouri Pest Control serving Arnold, Imperial, Barnhart, South County, St. Louis city and your local area too.  We serve all of Jefferson County

Tips For Keeping Pests Outside Where They Belong

Insects, rodents and other pests are outdoor creatures, but if given the choice they will always try to get in your home. Why?  Because you have created a great environment!  Let me explain, because you have made it so simple for them to find food or water or come in from either the cold or the heat. The trick to keeping them outdoors where they belong is to take every means necessary to prevent their getting in! The old adage holds true for pests as with everything else: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Here are some quick tips.

Take a nice slow walk around the perimeter of your home. Observe your landscaping closely, and trim hedges and shrubs away from the sides of the structure: not just a few inches, but a foot or even more if possible. If you keep a woodpile, make sure the logs are stacked across the yard and away from the house. Inconvenient in the winter perhaps, but it will help keep pests out in the summer when they are most active.  Not to mention wood piles stacked next to your home is likely to lead to a termite problem.

Check all windows and doors for possible entry points: remember, insects can fit into the tiniest of fissures. Mice can enter a hole as small as 1/4 of an inch and rats can enter1/2 inch openings.  Caulk all small cracks, and then stuff steel wool into larger areas such as gaps where the entry lines for your air conditioner enter the house.

Now take a tour of the inside of your home.  Check all screens on windows first to make sure you don’t have bent frames or space underneath that will allow insects to get in.  Box elder bugs are especially good at getting in this way, and these pests multiply like crazy once they get in: in fact, you may have problems well into the autumn months!

Use caulk if necessary around window and door areas: just as you did on the outside of your home. Check under your sinks and study areas where your water pipes come through the wall. Chances are there are spaces there where all kinds of critters can gain access: seal them off with steel wool.

And of course, for optimum protection you should always have a quality Missouri pest control company like Gateway Pest Control come to your home at least twice a year.  Gateway effectively gets rid of pests using only safe practices and products, so you can be sure the job will be done right.  Gateway may not be able to do anything about your mother-in-law, but when it comes to unwanted guests that have wings or four legs, we’ve got you covered!

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Every Home Needs Protected

Posted in Uncategorized on October 3rd, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

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We realize the economy is tuff….  Our business is ”living” through the same hard times as everyone else.  And we have seen the effects of the economy on business; clients that once requested bi-annual treatment now get by with quarterly service.  Those on once on quarterly plans call spring and fall and then sadly there are some living with bugs because the economy has forced them to choose between food and comfort.

As I mentioned most clients are now calling spring and fall, lucky for us fall is at hand.  But I wonder how many people actually realize why the fall treatment is so important?  All insects must survive the cold winter months. Some insect species congregate together in large groups as temperatures drop during fall, and seek out locations where they will be protected during winter. Once cold weather is past, they become active again and disperse away from their protected areas.

If an insect ‘congregation’ selected your home to pass the winter, and they were able to get inside through cracks, crevices, vents, or poorly fitting screens and doors, their spring migration may leave them trapped inside your home. Two insect species, the boxelder bug and the multicolored Asian lady beetle, are commonly trapped indoors during the spring and will often appear during late March to early April.
 

What kinds of insects usually get trapped indoors during the spring?
 

Boxelder Bug (Boisea trivittata)

This bug is approximately 1/2″ long. It is mostly black with red lines on its back. Immature stages are mostly red, with black legs and head. These bugs are plant feeders and feed almost exclusively on female (seed-bearing) boxelder trees (Acer negundo). They may also be found on female silver maple trees (Acer saccharinum). They do not feed on male trees, but may occasionally feed on the fruit of apple or plum trees.
 

Boxelder bugs invade homes in October and November and congregate in wall voids and other undisturbed locations. When crushed, they produce a strong odor. Their feces can cause a red stain on curtains, walls, clothing, and other resting places. They have been reported to bite occasionally, which causes a skin irritation and a red spot resembling an ulcer. Adults become active and move outdoors in spring when the boxelder buds open.
 

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
This lady beetle is approximately 1/4″ to 3/8″ long and comes in a variety of colors ranging from beige to yellowish-orange to dark reddish-orange with between 0-19 black spots on their body. The area behind the head and in front of the wings is ivory colored with a black M-shaped mark. They are very beneficial insects that feed on several pests of horticultural plants and crops. Adults may live for up to three years.
 

Asian lady beetles invade homes during October and November and congregate in dark, undisturbed locations such as wall voids or attics. When they become active in March or April, large numbers of them may be seen crawling on walls and ceilings inside the home. They do not sting, carry disease or bite. They have not been observed feeding on wood, cloth or stored food items in the home. If these beetles are handled, they will release a defensive chemical, which has a mild odor and may stain walls and fabrics.
 

What should I do now?
 

If these insects appear in your home during the spring, it is too late to solve the problem for this year. It is better to wait until summer and begin preventing next year’s invasion. You can provide immediate relief by using a vacuum cleaner to remove insects that are trying to get outside. If you decide to use the vacuum, remember to remove and seal the vacuum bag immediately. This keeps the insects from escaping and prevents the insect’s odorous defensive secretions from contaminating your vacuum cleaner.

It is very important your home’s protection is up to date, because if you allow insects to invade your home unmollested you may have to live with them all winter.  No attempt should be made to kill these insects while they are passing the winter in wall voids or attics. Killing them without cleaning out all of the dead bodies would provide a food source for scavenger insects like larder beetles and carpet beetles to get established. If these beetles are established, they are a bigger problem than either boxelder bugs or lady beetles because they will infest stored products, fabrics, etc.
 

How do I prevent another infestation next year?
 

Long-term control of boxelder bugs and multicolored Asian lady beetles begins outdoors. Although total exclusion is not realistic, all exterior openings should be considered as possible routes of entry and covered in some way to keep these insects out. Seal cracks and crevices that allow these insects to gain access to interior wall voids or attics. Caulk around cable entrances, window frames, doorframes, overhangs, facia boards, etc. Vents, weep holes, etc. that cannot be sealed should at least be covered with 16-mesh screening. These steps should be taken in June or July to prevent invasions later this fall.
 

Since lady beetles are beneficial insects, no direct control is recommended.  However, it will be helpful to reduce populations of boxelder bugs outside your home. Removing boxelder and silver maple trees around your home and neighborhood will reduce populations of this insect. In cases where homeowners do not want to remove these trees, infested trees can be sprayed with an appropriately labeled insecticide. The application should be made to trees during the spring, just after the young bugs have hatched from their eggs. Such treatments require special equipment and a license, so contact a company that specializes in treating ornamental plants.
 

In some situations, preventative chemical barriers may be applied around the home prior to invasions in the fall. They are applied to all outside walls and adjacent overhangs. However, without sealing exterior openings, these barriers provide only temporary relief.  In these cases it is useful to contact Gateway Pest Control to help protect your home.

Just because no direct control is recommended to control beneficial insects does it mean you can’t decide to go ahead and have them killed.  After all, we all have different tolerance levels for beneficial insects.  Personally any insect that enters my home has exceeded my tolerance level and will be treated as a nuisance and thus killed.  Most of our clients share my view, oh sure most people like to at least appear to be “GREEN” but truth be told living a green life-style tends to end when it involves sharing your home with bugs.

At Gateway Pest Control LLC we hope you have enjoyed our blog entry and would like to suggest today is a great time to schedule your fall service.  We answer the phones 24/7/365 because we know when you have a pest problem it doesn’t always happen between 8 and 5.

 

 

 

 

 

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Are People That Live in Apartments Scum?

Posted in Uncategorized on September 24th, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

 

pest control for apartments, roaches, cockroaches, ants, spiders

People that live in apartment buildings are scum, they must be why else would the people that own those buildings refuse to take care of their properties?  Before you get out the pitchforks let me just say you should be looking for a little sarcasm in my writing today.  The time has finally come for me to call landlords on the carpet and discuss their rental properties.

We recently did business with a couple of landlords that were by far the best example of good people I have had the pleasure of dealing with in quite some time.  Both insisted we treat their homes prior to treating their rental properties and each watched our technicians’ every move.  And then only after a brief questioning period inquiring if we treated apartment buildings the same as private homes were we allowed treat their apartment inventory.  You see these business men felt a personal obligation to their tenants to provide the same quality service they expected in their private lives.

I cannot express how refreshing it was to work with such individuals of character and honor.  Rental property is after all a business and as such most owners take every possible opportunity to save money.  As the owner of a pest control company I’ve encounter the entire spectrum of owners ranging from those that never have their property treated to those that treat just before the health department chains the doors shut to those that have their property treated on a regular schedule.  Each in their own mind justifies their actions.

I have heard owners say I built those builings, if there are any bugs the tenants brought them with them and thus they are not my problem.  Clearly they simply do not care about the people that call their property home.

I have had owners ask if we can just treat 1/4 of the apartment to save money or if we have some generic chemical that cost less.  Real estate investors that do not think twice about having their 6,000 square feet homes treated at a cost of $125 want their 700 square feet apartments treated for $4.16 each and couldn’t careless what corners are cut to make that possible.  Sadly there are pest control companies that jump through hoops to meet their demands.

Just so you know, we are not one of them.  Like most homeowners I once called an apartment home.  I was no less of a person then, nor am I a better person today because my home is a house.  Tenants deserve the same standard of protection as the owner of the property and that is what Gateway Pest Control delivers.  Gateway Pest Control is simply the best pest control service for the dollar in the St. Louis metro area.  We treat apartment buildings with the same diligence we use when we treat homes and we treat the renters with respect.

Recently we treated an apartment complex in which all of the tenants blamed a new renter for the recent invasion of cockroaches.  The young lady was clearly devastated, emotional distressed and on the brink of tears.  I paused our treatment for a few moments just to talk to her.  I explained that even the cleanest of homes can from time to time have issues, in short I allowed her to regain her dignity.  Was it her fault?  Yes, clearly if you saw the state of her apartment you would know she was the reason for the infestation.  But that does not lessen the fact she is a human that deserves her dignity.  So instead of chastising her I offer a few pointers and left her feeling better.

It’s not everyday you have the opportunity to restore someone’s dignity. 

If you are the owner of rental property, or the decision maker attempting to choose a pest control company to service your property and you want the cheapest provider, simply stated Gateway Pest Control may not be the one to call.  However, if you want a company that treats all people with respect, a business that understands value for your dollar then a call to Gateway Pest Control is the one to make.  Value and being the cheapest do not go hand in hand.  However, Value and Quality should forever be linked together.

 

(636) 525-1008

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

 

 

 

Gateway Pest Control has been ranked as the #1 pest control service in  Arnold, Imperial and St. Louis, Missouri.  A family owned business we take great pride in our ability to provide the best pest control in St. Louis.  We do not try to be the cheapest pest control in St. Louis, nor to we strive to be the most expensive.  Our pricing strategy is simple we offer the very best service at reasonable prices.  Thus, if you are having a problem with roaches, cockroaches, ants, spiders, millipedes, bees, mice or simple bugs we are the one to call.

 

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What to do When Ants Invade Your Home.

Posted in Uncategorized on August 18th, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

 Get rid of ants in St. Louis area

Carpenter Ants

It always tweaks me when a pest control company wants to throw around scientific names for insects.  Only one of my clients wants to talk in scientific terms and she is a teacher that I think just wants to show off a little.  With that said now let me speak out of the other side of my mouth and say Carpenter Ants maybe known by three scientific names:

Common Name Scientific Name
Black Carpenter Ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus(DeGeer)
Red Carpenter Ant Camponotus ferrugineus (Fab.)
Smaller Carpenter Ant Camponotus nearcticus (Emery)

I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone that wants insects sharing their home especially those that can do structural damage.  Carpenter ants primarily are a nuisance by their presence when found in parts of the home such as the kitchen, bathroom, living room and other quarters.   However if you see  20 or more in your home in the daytime near one location, it is possible that the colony is well established in the home and the nest may have been extended into sound wood, sometimes causing structural damage.  They do not eat wood, but they do destroy wood removing quantities of it to expand their nest size.

Just because you find a random ant or two does not mean you have a colony or nest living inside your home.  They may simply be foraging for food with the nest located outside.  Outdoors, they are frequently seen running over plants and tree trunks or living in moist, partly rotten wood stumps. Nevertheless, carpenter ant inquiries rank first over all other household structural pests in Missouri.

Identification

Carpenter ants are among the largest ants found in homes and live in colonies containing three castes consisting of winged and wingless queens, winged males and different sized workers. Winged males are much smaller than winged queens. Wingless queens measure 5/8 inch, winged queens 3/4 inch to the tips of their folded brownish wings, small minor workers 1/4 inch and large major workers 1/2 inch. Workers have some brown on them while queens are black. Workers have large heads and a small thorax while adult swarmers have a smaller head and large thorax. Carpenter ants have a smoothly rounded arched (convex) shape to the top of the thorax when viewed from the side and a pedicel between the thorax and abdomen consisting of only one segment or node. They have constricted waists, elbowed antennas and the reproductive’s forewings are larger than the hindwings, transparent or brownish and not easily removed.  Adults are usually black with some species red, brown or yellow occurring on parts of the body and legs. Eggs are about 1/8-inch long, cream colored and oval. Larvae are legless and grub-like, later pupating in tough silken, tan-colored cocoons erroneously referred to as “ant eggs.”

Life Cycle and Habits

Queen Worker

Winged male and female carpenter ants (swarmers) emerge from mature colonies usually from March to July. After mating, males die and newly fertilized females (mated for life), establish a new colony in a small cavity in wood, under bark, etc. and each lays 15 to 20 eggs in 15 days. The egg stage takes about 24 days, larval stage 21 days and pupal stage 21 days or about 66 days from egg to adult at 70 to 90 degrees F. Cool weather may lengthen this period up to 10 months. The colony does not produce swarmers until about three years later. A mature colony, after three to six years, has 2,000 to 4,000 individuals. During the first brood, larvae are fed entirely by a fluid secreted from the queen’s mouth where she does not take food, but uses stored fat reserves and wing muscles for her nourishment. The few workers emerging from the first brood assume duties of the colony, collecting food, excavating galleries to enlarge the nest and tending the eggs, larvae and pupae of the second generation. Workers regurgitate food for nourishment of the developing larvae and queen. She has few duties except to lay eggs.

In later generations, workers of various sizes are produced (polymorphism) into major and minor workers, that are all sterile females. Males formed are winged swarmers. Larger “major” workers guard the nest, battle intruders, explore and forage for food while smaller “minor” workers expand the nest and care for the young. workers, when disturbed, carry off the larvae and pupa, which must be fed and tended or they die. In a mature colony, there is usually one queen with 200 to 400 winged individuals produced as swarmers. Workers have strong jaws and readily bite (sharp pinch) when contacted.

Nests are usually established in soft, moist (not wet), decayed wood or occasionally in an existing wood cavity or void area in a structure that is perfectly dry. Workers cut galleries in the wood, expanding the nest size for the enlarging colony. Galleries are irregular, usually excavated with the wood grain (sometimes across the grain) into softer portions of the wood. The walls of the nest are smooth and clean (sandpapered appearance) with shredded sawdust-like wood fragments, like chewed up toothpicks (frass), carried from the nest and deposited outside. These piles of wood fragments, often found beneath special openings (windows) or nest openings, may contain portions of insects, empty seed coats, etc.

Carpenter ants do not eat wood but excavate wood galleries to rear their young ants and carry aphids to plants, placing them on leaves for the production of honey dew. The food diet is of great variety (omnivorous) of both plant and animal origin such as plant juices, fresh fruits, insects (living or dead), meats, syrup, honey, jelly, sugar, grease, fat, honey dew (aphid excrement), etc. They feed readily on termites and usually never co-exist with them in a home. Workers are known to forage for food as far as 100 yards from their nest.

Control Measures

The most important and often most difficult part of carpenter ant control is locating the nest or nests. Once the nest location is found, control is very easy and simple. Sometimes more than one colony is present in the structure or on its grounds, so a thorough inspection is very important. Steps to a successful inspection include an interview with family members, inspection indoors, inspection outdoors and sound detection.

Interview

Often children and adults of the residence know where ants are seen, where large numbers are most prevalent, movement patterns, moisture in the structure, moisture problems of the past, if swarmers were seen, location of sawdust-like material in piles, populations outdoors, etc.

Inspection Indoors

Nests can be found in either moist or dry wood. However, carpenter ants prefer to nest in moist wood with a moisture content considerable over 15 percent, often caused by rain, leaks, condensation, etc. Structural timber is about 12 to 15 percent moisture. A moisture meter can find wet spots to pinpoint possible nest locations. Inspect behind bathroom tiles, around tubs, showers, sinks, dishwashers, washing machines, refrigerator drip pans, etc. Check wood affected by moisture from contact with the soil such as steps, porch supports, siding, seepage from plugged drain gutters, chimney flashing, wooden shingle roofs, hollow porch posts, columns, leaking window and door frames, window boxes, crawl spaces, pipes, poor pitch of porch roofs, flat deck porch roofs, under porches, attics, etc. Sometimes, nests are found in dry environments, such as hollow veneer doors, curtain rods, small void areas between the door casing and ceiling, false beams, or under insulation in attics. Look for damaged timbers, swarmers in spider webs, wood piles indoors, piles of wood debris ejected from the colony (pencil sharpener shaving-like), “windows” or small opening to a nest, etc. Gently tap floor joists, etc. with a hammer. A nest cavity gives a hollow ring. A knife blade will penetrate the wood if infested.

Baiting

Some may use tiny piles of sugar at two to three feet intervals around the kitchen, bathroom, etc. in attempt to determine where the nest is located. Others use drops of honey or corn syrup placed on the back of masking tape. Make observations late at night, following ants back to their nest entrance.

Flushing Agent

A household aerosol spray, containing pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide, applied directly into cracks, crevices or holes, will excite the ants (repellent action) causing them to come running out revealing the presence of their nest in some instances.

Inspection Outdoors

Look for ants traveling from a tree or stump to the structure. They may travel over tree branches or vines touching the roof, electrical and telephone wires, fences next to the house, piles of firewood, logs, or railroad ties nearby or hollow living trees with entrance knot holes, etc. Workers are most active at night (midnight), traveling from their nest to a food source following trails but no particular trail leading directly to the nest. They do establish chemical (pheromone) trails.

Sound Detection

An active colony may produce a distinct, dry rustling sound (sometimes loud), similar to the crinkling of cellophane. It may be heard in a wall when standing in a room. A listening device, such as a stethoscope, may be useful when conditions are quiet and outside noises are at a minimum. Even a cat may hear noises in a home caused by ant mandibles (jaws) not from chewing wood or eating food, but as their form of communication, especially if the colony is disturbed.

Prevention

Homeowners should trim all trees and bushes so branches do not touch or come in contact with the house. Correct moisture problems such as leaking roofs, leaking chimney flashing, or plumbing, poorly ventilated attics or crawl spaces and blocked gutters. Replace rotted or water-damaged wood and eliminate wood to soil contact. Remove dead stumps within 50 feet of the house, if practical, and repair trees with damage at broken limbs, and holes in the trunk. Seal cracks and crevices in the foundation, especially where utility pipes and wiring occur from outside. Be sure to store firewood off the ground away from the house and bring in only enough firewood (first examining it) to be used quickly . Consider non-organic mulches near the house in heavily infested ant areas. High moisture conditions must be eliminated to help control carpenter ants, prevent future attacks and prevent “wood decay” fungus infection.

 So, what should you do when ants invade your home?  You might think I would say your first move should be to call Gateway Pest Control, but you would be wrong.  If possible attempt to locate the ant next or colony prior to calling.  If we know before our arrival the location of the colony it will lessen the financial burden and permit us to be the most effective in our treatment of the issue. 

 

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What to do before I come….

Posted in Uncategorized on August 16th, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

Clutter, bed bugs, roaches, cockroaches and pest control

What to do before treating for bugs.

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, after all I’ve heard those words a thousand times, but every time a client says, “….oh just spray where you can.”  I have to wonder what are they thinking?  Gees, I can’t figure out why our home has been taken over by critters.  But hey I’ll get the bug man out here right away!

Calling in an expert to help you deal with a pest issue is normally the best step, it should not however be your first step.  Insects, especially cockroaches and bedbugs love clutter.  It provides them with cover and quite often a food source as well.  Thus, your first step even before picking up the phone and calling Gateway Pest Control at (636) 525-1008 is to clean the home. 

The definition of cleaning may be part of the issue, a home can technically be clean but also cluttered.  Clutter in affect trumps your cleanliness by providing an excellent habitat for your critters to populate.  That same clutter also makes proper treatment impossible.  For a technician to properly treat your home he needs access to every inch of baseboard as possible.  Therefore, when a home owner stacks or more often mounds piles of their possessions around the walls it prevents proper pest control measures from being applied.

Gateway Pest has been asked to treat homes in which you could not see 85 to 90% of the walls….  In those cases we explain the situation, do the best we can and hope for the best.  Talking to the client is a critical part of the treatment, if they do not completely understand their role and the condition their home needs to be in to enable pest control measures to succeed the problem will continue.  It is also important to note that time does not permit us to stand by while the client moves piles from one location to the next.  We schedule a typical spray every 90 minutes, as a result our technicians have a limited window of time to properly treat your property.

In review remember clutter is a bugs friend and prevents proper treatment.  Clean before you call and stage your home in such a manner we can see and reach the baseboards (including in the closets).  Feeling over-whelmed?  Don’t stress, even if you can’t have your home 100% ready to be sprayed we will work with you to help solve the problem, we simply ask for a heads up so we can schedule the proper time to treat your home.

Gateway Pest Control (636) 525-1008

 

 

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I love Cockroaches… and ants…. and spiders…

Posted in Uncategorized on August 9th, 2010 by Gateway

www.gatewaypestcontrol.com

 

Jefferson County Missouri Pest Control serving Arnold, Imperial, Barnhart, South County, St. Louis city and your local area too

Yes I love roaches…  it’s true.  And not just one kind…. oh no, I love all kinds of roaches.  I love German Cockroaches.  I love American Cockroaches.  Oh, and I especially love those little Oriental Cockroaches too.  But don’t forget about spiders or ants because I love them too!!!

What?  You don’t love these little Critters?  That is exactly why I do love them…  because they keep you calling me!

Of course people say they don’t love roaches and ants and spiders….but I’m not sure if I believe them or not?  After all if you truly don’t love these little critters crawling around your home why have you worked so hard to create the perfect environment for them to survive? 

Shocked?  Stunned?  Or just living in denial?  If you have teenagers, or find yourself cleaning up the mess from a midnight snack the next day when you come home from work chances are it is just a matter of time before a roach or at the very least an ant will call your place home.  Why?  The answer is simple, they have to eat and if you are going to insist on providing them with an easy meal they will accept. 

I would estimate in the homes I treat for cockroaches I discover a hidden stash of trash which includes food particles, candy wrappers and half eaten items in 98% of those homes.  The majority of the time this insect haven is located in the children’s living space.  But not always, remember protecting your environment begins with you….

So you may hate ants and spiders and roaches….and that is okay, because we love them!!!!!!!! 

Gateway Pest Control

(636) 525-1008

 

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